What happens to your waste?

Looking at the bigger picture

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Why we need to recycle

As consumers buy more and more products (such as electronic devices), the need to consistently recycle and reuse becomes ever more important. This increases waste volume, such as discarded packaging and batteries and disused devices.
Effective recycling solutions benefit people, businesses, and the environment.

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Sparing resources

Recycling saves valuable raw materials and conserves energy.

Maximising space

Our space is finite; landfills poison our environment with hazardous, toxic substances.

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A healthier environment

A safer and greener environment improves the quality and enjoyment of our lives.

Saving energy

Recycling means we consume fewer raw materials and use less energy than we would to mine and refine new ones. Fractions derived from recycling go back into the supply chain to make new products.

Recycling

What can be recycled?

We believe recycling should be simple.

However, with so many types of products and materials, and multiple packaging symbols, it is not always easy to distinguish what is recyclable from what is not.

To help simplify things, we have assembled an interactive guide on what you can and cannot recycle, with some general information about what happens during recycling and what can be reused.

Learn about the recycling process by selecting the icons below.

Large domestic appliances

Washing machines, tumble dryers, dishwashing machines, cookers;
The first stage of recycling is decontamination: cables and other electrical components are removed; ballasts, plastics, iron compounds and other metals are separated and recovered. These materials are then sent for further processing and recovery.

Recycling process

1. Pre-shedding decontamination

2. Shredding

3. Separation

Recovered materials

Cables

Concrete

Capacitator

Plastic

Ferrous Metal

Non-Ferrous Metal

Temperature exchange equipment /Cooling appliances

Refrigerators, freezers, automatic cold products delivery machines.

Products include fridges, freezers, and any appliances with refrigerating devices such as water coolers. Some appliances also contain refrigerant gases classified as Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFC), hydrofluorocarbons (HFC) and hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) that are now banned.

These gases are captured and treated in ODS recovery plants. Cold appliance de-pollution entails a variety of processes: compressors are decontaminated to recover ODS and oils; insulating foam is treated to recover ODS; metals are salvaged and resold, and plastics can be reused for new products. Recovered oils and ODS are destroyed in a specialised treatment process.

Recycling process

1. Decontamination

2. Shredding

3. Separation

4. Foam decontamination

Recovered materials

Gas

Oil

Capacitator

Plastic

Ferrous Metal

Foam

Display equipment

Televisions, screens, LCD, pc monitors

Display equipment includes cathode ray tubes (found in old-style TV sets and computer monitors) and flat-screen TVs and computer monitors, such as plasma and liquid crystal displays (LCD).
Cathode ray tubes (CRT) contain hazardous phosphor powder, leaded glass, copper, and other rare metals. These materials can be reused to make new products. Panel and funnel glass from the cathode ray tubes are also recovered. The coating on the funnel glass is removed and the glass is cleaned for new CRT manufacture.
Most LCD TVs use mercury lamps to light the screen. To remove the lamps, the appliance must be disassembled before processing the LCD screen. Research is currently being carried out to develop more effective, automated solutions.

Recycling process

1. Hand dismantling

2. Cathode ray tube separation (Pb, Ba)

3. Crushing and metal removal

4. Glass cleaning

Recovered materials

Ferrous Metal

Foam